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State Representative Ryan Spain announced the official launch of his Second Annual Summer Reading Club Program for grade school students who live within the 73rd Legislative District.  The program is offered to encourage students to read over the summer and promote the lifelong benefits of literacy.

“Students who read over the summer enter the school year in the fall ahead of students who do not read over the summer.  This is a fun way to reward students with a free ice cream and swimming party for simply reading eight books over their summer break and returning a form signed by a parent or guardian to invite them to a swimming party.  It’s important for all of us in our communities to encourage students to get ahead by becoming better readers,” said Spain.

Brochures were distributed recently through area schools, but are also available on Rep. Spain’s website at www.repryanspain.com or by calling his Peoria District Office.  Participation in this program can overlap with any other summer reading program offered through area libraries.  Participating students have until July 31st to read their eight books and will be invited to a Summer Reading Ice Cream & Swimming Party in August upon completion of the program.  Attendees of the party will also be given an opportunity to receive information on college savings programs offered through the State of Illinois.



Completed application forms can also be submitted online here.

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State Representative Ryan Spain joined Illinois State Police Director Leo Schmitz in urging Illinois firearm owners to file paperwork early to renew their Firearm Owner Identification (FOID) Cards as the first wave of the 10-year renewal will create a backlog of renewal applications.

Illinois State Police Director Leo Schmitz recommends, “gun owners get their renewal application in at least one to two months in advance so we have adequate time to process them and get a new card our before expiration.”

“With more than 50,000 FOID cards due for renewal between June 1 and August 1 due to amendments to State laws on the 10-year renewal process in 2008, I am urging my constituents who are FOID holders to renew as early as possible to allow adequate time for processing before expiration,” said Rep. Spain on Tuesday.

The Illinois State Police oversees the FOID card system and issues the cards that are required to buy or possess a firearm or ammunition in Illinois.  FOID card applications require state and federal background checks, as well as review of the database from the Illinois Department of Human Services to confirm applicants have not been in a mental institution in the past five years.  Persons with common names may find additional delays as identities are confirmed.

Illinois State Police have already sent renewal notices to those whose cards will expire June 1.  Applicants can visit the ISP’s Firearms Services Bureau website at ispfsb.com to renew online.  The cost of the card is $10. 

Applicants must be Illinois residents and include their Driver’s License or State ID card number.  Applicants under the age of 21 must have a parents’ signature on the application.  Anyone who needs assistance with the FOID card renewal, and those who prefer paper applications, may call 217-782-7980 and select menu option 0.  Applicants should also make sure the name and address on FOID applications match the records on file for them at the Secretary of State’s Office, otherwise the renewal process will be delayed further.


State Representative Ryan Spain (R-Peoria) co-sponsored House Joint Resolution 124 to adopt a revenue estimate to begin the budgeting process for fiscal year 2019.

“When I was sworn in as State Representative, I pledged to adhere to the US and State Constitution. Our State Constitution mandates the Illinois General Assembly set a revenue estimate and not spend more than we bring in as a State. In the time I have served in Springfield, the legislative majority has not followed these requirements, with terrible fiscal consequences,” critiqued Rep. Spain.

House Joint Resolution 124 adopts a revenue estimate of $37.672 billion for fiscal year 2019, based on the estimate provided by the Commission on Government Forecasting and Accountability (COGFA).

“After setting a revenue estimate, our appropriations committees can then take up the hard work of crafting a balanced FY 19 State Budget that does not spend more than we bring in,” Spain continued.

A revenue estimate is required by state law:

The House and Senate by joint resolution shall adopt or modify such estimates as may be appropriate. The joint resolution shall constitute the General Assembly’s estimate, under paragraph B of Section 2 of Article VIII of the Constitution, of funds estimated to be available during the next fiscal year (25 ILCS 155/4(a))

It is also required by Subsection (b) of Section 2 of Article VIII of the Constitution of Illinois:

Appropriations for a fiscal year shall not exceed funds estimated by the General Assembly to be available during that year.


After a phone call on Friday with Dr. Shah, Director of the Illinois Department of Public Health, Rep. Ryan Spain (R-Peoria) is sharing important information about the risk of synthetic cannabinoid products. Dozens of people in Illinois, including two who died, have experienced severe bleeding, such as coughing up blood, blood in the urine, severe bloody nose, and/or bleeding gums, after using synthetic cannabinoids. The Illinois Department of Public Health strongly urges everyone NOT to use synthetic cannabinoids. Synthetic cannabinoids are human-made, mind-altering chemicals that are either sprayed on dried, shredded plant material so they can be smoked or sold as liquids to be vaporized and inhaled in e-cigarettes and other device. They are not safe and can be unpredictable, dangerous, or even life-threatening.



Governor Bruce Rauner signed bipartisan legislation today that protects safety net and rural hospitals while ensuring continued federal support for quality healthcare to more than three million Illinoisans.

Senate Bill 1773 ensures the state will continue to receive federal matching funds to offer services for Medicaid beneficiaries through the Hospital Assessment Program, which brings in $3.5 billion annually.

The Hospital Assessment Program is set to expire at the end of June. A bipartisan group of legislators worked with the Illinois Health and Hospital Association and the Department of Healthcare and Family Services (HFS) to redesign the program, create a more equitable reimbursement process, and ensure more efficient use of taxpayer dollars.

“Our teams worked hard to make sure our most vulnerable citizens can continue to receive quality medical services and to keep hospitals in underserved communities,” Gov. Rauner said. “I’d like to thank all the legislators, state officials, and stakeholders who worked to restructure the program. Their unwavering dedication will help keep the Medicaid program sustainable for the future.”

The state currently uses old data sets, sometimes based on care that was provided as far back as 2005, to reimburse hospitals for Medicaid services. The new model will use updated data and also ensure that more of the reimbursements are based on actual services hospitals provide. It also dedicates more than $260 million to help hospitals transform their operations to better serve their communities, such as offering more urgent and outpatient care.

“This legislation increases dynamic, claims-based payments so that dollars follow services for Medicaid patients, and it updates outdated utilization data that doesn’t reflect the current delivery of services,” said Felicia Norwood, Director of HFS. “Healthcare delivery and where our beneficiaries receive their care has changed dramatically over the last ten years and our hospital reimbursement structure should recognize these changes. The new program draws down as much federal revenue as we believe is permissible and helps hospitals transition to more effective healthcare delivery models over time.”

The Federal government will need to sign off on the new terms of the program before it can take effect.